Every walker is a guard on patrol to protect the ineffable.
— Rebecca Solnit, Wanderlust: A History of Walking

We invite you to download a map and take a walk. Each experience and expression will be different. We want to hear it all. Send us an email with pictures, writing, musings - anything your wonder and wandering brought you. We will add it to the Park Wonder conversation and welcome your voice.

Send info to: Sarah Walko, Director of Education and Outreach at the Visual Art Center of New Jersey: swalko@artcenternj.org


 

MAPs

Photography by Matt Jensen

 
The Passaic River is approximately 80 miles long. The river in its upper course flows in a highly circuitous route, meandering through the swamp lowlands between the ridge hills of rural and suburban northern New Jersey, the Great Swamp, draining much of the northern portion of the state through its tributaries. In its lower portion, it flows through the most urbanized and industrialized areas of the state, including along downtown Newark. DOWNLOAD THE MAP HERE!

The Passaic River is approximately 80 miles long. The river in its upper course flows in a highly circuitous route, meandering through the swamp lowlands between the ridge hills of rural and suburban northern New Jersey, the Great Swamp, draining much of the northern portion of the state through its tributaries. In its lower portion, it flows through the most urbanized and industrialized areas of the state, including along downtown Newark.


DOWNLOAD THE MAP HERE!

The Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge conserves its natural resources for the public while protecting threatened and endangered species for future generations. Located in Morris County, New Jersey, about 26 miles west of Manhattan's Times Square, the refuge consists of 7,768 acres of varied habitats, and the refuge has become an important resting and feeding area for more than 244 species of birds. Fox, deer, muskrat, turtles, fish, frogs and a wide variety of wildflowers and plants can be found on the refuge. DOWNLOAD THE MAP HERE!

The Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge conserves its natural resources for the public while protecting threatened and endangered species for future generations. Located in Morris County, New Jersey, about 26 miles west of Manhattan's Times Square, the refuge consists of 7,768 acres of varied habitats, and the refuge has become an important resting and feeding area for more than 244 species of birds. Fox, deer, muskrat, turtles, fish, frogs and a wide variety of wildflowers and plants can be found on the refuge.

DOWNLOAD THE MAP HERE!

Gateway National Park merges history, culture and nature in the same place. Forts which defended New York Harbor now preserve nearby coastal areas, and more than 300 species of birds on the Atlantic Flyway visit former airfields and landfills, now transformed into wildlife habitats and recreation areas. The park holds Fort Hancock Historic Post, The Sandy Hook Lighthouse, the Keepers' Quarters and a barn. DOWNLOAD THE MAP HERE!

Gateway National Park merges history, culture and nature in the same place. Forts which defended New York Harbor now preserve nearby coastal areas, and more than 300 species of birds on the Atlantic Flyway visit former airfields and landfills, now transformed into wildlife habitats and recreation areas. The park holds Fort Hancock Historic Post, The Sandy Hook Lighthouse, the Keepers' Quarters and a barn.

DOWNLOAD THE MAP HERE!

Union County’s Watchung Reservation, a 2,000+ acre preserve located in the northern portion of the County. The reservation consists mainly of the upper valley of Blue Brook, between the ridges of First Watchung Mountain and Second Watchung Mountain. A dam near the headwaters of the creek creates Lake Surprise. DOWNLOAD THE MAP HERE!

Union County’s Watchung Reservation, a 2,000+ acre preserve located in the northern portion of the County. The reservation consists mainly of the upper valley of Blue Brook, between the ridges of First Watchung Mountain and Second Watchung Mountain. A dam near the headwaters of the creek creates Lake Surprise.


DOWNLOAD THE MAP HERE!


Language is like a road, it cannot be perceived all at once because it unfolds in time, whether heard or read. This narrative or temporal element has made writing and walking resemble each other.
The magic of the street is the mingling of the errand and the epiphany.
Walking . . . is how the body measures itself against the earth.
— Rebecca Solnit, Wanderlust: A History of Walking